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Why Collegiate Athletes Should Be Paid

By Kevin Barry

Staff Writer

NCAA should pay its athletes – The Budget

Should collegiate level athletes be paid? An age old question that the NCAA has been dancing around for years upon years. Back in the days of normality in October of 2019 California Governor Gavin Newsome signed a bill to allow California Collegiate athletes to be able to sign endorsement deals (where they could be compensated for their craft) and even hire an agent. This is to ensure that the top level athletes can get their money and to prevent schools from being under fire for overpaying or underpaying their student athlete

A study by the NCAA back in 2017 found that even some D3 sports like mens swimming on average can take up 45 hours of their week, 5 hours more than their 40 hours a week average spent on academics. Leaving only 83 hours a week left for sleep, social life, family time, and meals; which is only about 11 hours per day. Despite the rules of only 20 hours per week max of college athletics, it’s nearly impossible to make a name for yourself without doing double that. My point here is that with no real break given all day, these athletes should at least be compensated for their hard work and dedication.

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Brood X Cicadas 2021

A Delight… Or a Disaster?

By Morgan Lane

Staff Writer

A close-up of shedded cicada shells versus a living, vibrant one. (Via: WLWT5 (NBC) )

Get those umbrellas and rackets ready. Starting in the beginning to Mid-May of 2021, the East coast will begin to be infested with large, monstrous bugs called cicadas. When the ground temperature reaches an average of around 64 degrees, the millions of Brood X, or, “Eastern Brood” cicadas will doom states such as Maryland, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Tennessee, New York, Ohio, and Indiana, among others. 

For four to six weeks, the loud cry of the cicadas will be ringing all throughout the state, even in one’s own backyard. They are only around an inch or two long, but with the overwhelming quantity of them, the sound will be nothing short of a choral disaster. The loud noise they create can reach up to 100 decibels, and they can be loud enough to cover the sound of a plane flying in the air. It’s been said that the sound tends to reduce at night. But, it is possible that stubborn outliers could stay out and disturb people’s sleep. “Cicadas are quite loud so if they do make noise at night, it’ll be hard to sleep,” says 10th grader Vy Tran. Scarily enough, Hammond’s Officer Scott adds on, “…They made a lot of noise. You hear them all night long.” But thankfully, the demon spawn only have one main reason for being above ground: to create the next generation.

In a nutshell, the generation creation cycle consists of boys crying for girls, girls going to boys, mating, egg laying, and dying. Pretty useless, right? The booming, “cacophony of stupidity,” as Hammond Teacher Mr. Livieratos describes it, is actually just mating calls. Male cicadas are making their call out to females, in order to reproduce. Once they do so, the females create small slits into tree branches to set her eggs. After the male has found a female to reproduce with and the female has laid her eggs, both will die a few weeks later, leaving the eggs on their own. These eggs will eventually hatch, and the cicadas will come out of them and make their way to the ground. For 17 years, the babies will lazily indulge in tree roots until they grow up and repeat the same process their parents did. 

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George Floyd’s Death, BLM Protests, Derek Chauvin’s Trial, and Police Convictions

By Ariyanah Shelton

Staff Writer

Source: Jacquelyn Martin, Associated Press

Police brutality may have caused a black man named George Floyd to lose his life by using over aggressive force. On Monday May 25, 2020 a man named George Floyd lost his life after police were called by a clerk at Cup Foods reporting that Floyd had used a counterfeit bill to pay for his purchase.

After being approached by an employee of Cup Foods about the use of the counterfeit bill, Floyd refused to reenter the store to talk about the bill in question. According to an article written by Nicholas Burroughs and Jack Healy in Independent, titled “George Floyd: Inside the Minneapolis corner store whose worker made the 911 call that led to his killing,” Floyd was sitting in a car just outside the store when a white police responding to the call arrived. The actions taken by the police in the next few minutes will forever be remembered by all the bystanders watching.

Protest, after protest, after protest, occurred not only in the United States but all over the world. People of all races protested, and continued to protest for justice, and to put an end to all the brutality coming from officers who were hired to protect the people. They were tired of the wrong decisions, the racism, the anger, the lack of training, the way they overreact to situations, and the number of black lives that were being affected by police officers actions.

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Varsity Girls Soccer Coach Comments on Fall Season

By Leaana Khan

Co-Editorials Editor 

Nichole Lainez, Senior
Megan Gould, Senior

Despite numerous challenges this season, Hammond’s Girls Varsity Soccer team is back and is persevering through them all, according to Coach Schaefer. When asked how the season is going so far, Schaefer said, “The season is going well; we are having a lot of fun just being together and getting out to play. We waited a long time for the season to get started and so we are grateful for the time to be playing together. We have learned a lot about each other and have made tremendous progress in terms of our understanding of the game.” She also mentioned the amazing performance of the three captains: seniors Camryn Johnson and Grace Yodzis and junior Laura Keister.

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Cross Country: COVID edition

By Ada Wang

Staff Writer

Photo of Hammond Track, by Wayne Low

As the cross country season comes to a close, some of the members of the team and coaches about this unprecedented season have described how COVID-19 has created new challenges for many high school sports teams.

Mr. Kosisky, a coach with Hammond’s cross country team, discussed some of the challenges, saying that, “The most significant changes and challenges would be preparation, weather, and health concerns due to the pandemic. For example, paying attention to the student’s well-being is more important than ever. We have some athletes that have been running during the pandemic and we had athletes that were not running. We also had some athletes that did not want to join the team this season due to COVID, which we understand. It has been different trying to bring a team together in a short amount of time. However, the students have been awesome and dedicated.” 

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Hammond Cheer Update: Fall Sports Season 2021

By Lydia Jensen 

Co-Editorials Editor 

Pictured above: Hammond Cheer Team in Fall 2020. Photo provided by Bella Deblasio. 

This fall season, Hammond’s varsity cheerleading has continued and the team will be present to cheer at every home football game, but is restricted from cheering at away games for now. Cheerleaders are still allowed to cheer, stunt, and tumble, but must wear a mask at all times and sign in. 

In addition to this, the schedules for the games are very flexible and change often because of the pandemic, and the best way to know what games are next is to keep in contact with athletes and their coaches because of their tendency to change. 

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A Closer Look at Hammond’s Project Linus Chapter

By Halimah Kargbo

Features Editor

A Project Linus meeting from the 2020-2021 school year

Hammond’s Project Linus chapter is a club dedicated to not only community service, but also to building friendships and camaraderie. Meetings, which occur over Google Meet every Tuesday at 3 pm, are a safe and comfortable space for Hammond students to come and engage in various discussions or activities.

“People don’t really understand that we don’t want to just be the club that can get you some quick service hours,” senior Feben Abiy says. “We essentially want to be a place for students to just vent and be creative; sometimes we watch shows/movies, give each other advice, or just encourage people to come and socialize.”

Feben is the president of Project Linus this year and shares insights into how the club has had to change due to the new virtual environment.

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A preview into Hammond softball

By Jordan Rodriguez 

Staff Editor

2019 County Championship win against Mt. Hebron High School

With no 2020 season, the Hammond Varsity softball team is still the reigning County Champions (2019 County Champions)  and they are looking to continue as the County champs. The softball team is led by the Varsity coach Mr. Russell Kovach, who has been a part of Hammond’s amazing softball program going on three years now and is a biology teacher at Hammond. As of 2020, the softball team has added a new member to the coaching staff Ms. Anna Pallozzi, who is a middle school teacher and another great leader in the softball program. She is currently the Junior Varsity coach.  

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Hammond Field Hockey: Returning to play after a year in the pandemic

By Lizzy Hughes 

Staff Writer

Photo of Varsity Field Hockey 2021 seniors

With fall sports starting in Howard County, Hammond Field Hockey is in the middle of their season. COVID-19 has brought many challenges for many players on the team, but the Hammond Varsity team continues to improve from their last season.

This year Hammond only had enough players for one varsity team, but all of the players have worked hard to win several games so far.

Hammond’s Varsity head coach Abell states: “The season is going great, especially for a pandemic. The team is having fun and making improvements as we make our way through the season. COVID-19 has definitely impacted the way practices run, but we warm up separately to comply with social distancing. We also do more individual prep, and the girls are excited to be out and having fun playing the sport they enjoy.” 

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Hammond Dramastics: A Night of Improv Games and Fun

By Isabel Sinnott

A&E Editor

From hammondhightheatre.com, the cover for the March Dramastics performance

The Hammond Dramastics group had its most recent performance two weeks ago on March 17. They performed on Zoom; the new virtual format providing new difficulties and challenges from how it used to be performed in person.

Dramastics is an improv group that any student at Hammond can audition for where a group of students plays fun improv games for the audience. There are a variety of games that they play, from guessing games to versions of charades to games that require participation from the audience. 

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