Category: Editorials

Robinhood: Safeguard or Tyrant?

By Joseph Gray

Staff Writer

Robinhood 2021 Review: Is It a Top Pick? | The Ascent by Motley Fool
Image Source: Robinhood

Robinhood, a widely popular stock trading app that is advertised to teens and adults, has come under fire. In the past year, two major events have transpired. Back in June, 20-year old Alexander Kearns was trading options on Robinhood. A student at the University of Nebraska, Kearns had picked up stocks and stock trading during the COVID-19 quarantine. Kearns awoke one day to find that the Robinhood app claimed he was $730,000 in debt. 

Confused and broken, Kearn’s took his own life on June 12th, 2020. Kearns left a note reading, “How was a 20 year old with no income able to get assigned almost a million dollars worth of leverage?” It was quickly discovered that Kearns app had glitched and in fact, did not have that much leverage. Robinhood has since apologized and promised changes to the platform, yet come 2021, nothing has changed and no one has been held responsible for the death of Alexander E. Kearns.

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President Biden’s Immigration Plan

Biden introduced a bill giving undocumented immigrants a path to citizenship.

By Ada Wang

Staff Writer

Biden immigration policy changes will take time, experts say
Source: Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call

In mid-February, President Joe Biden and his Capitol Hill allies introduced his immigration plan to Congress. His plan, if it were to be passed, would give the opportunity to 11 million undocumented immigrants to be able to apply for a green card after a five year period of residency. They would then receive a green card officially after a total of 8 years of residency, provided they do not get into legal trouble. 

Biden and his administration also issued a temporary policy that would require immigration agents to determine deportation on a case-to-case basis. This means that the immigration customs agents would have to seek approval and go through all the proper channels before deporting people who are not national security threats, people who have not recently crossed the border illegally, and people who do not have a felony conviction, which is the most severe classification of crime, including crimes like murder and kidnapping.

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Why YOU should play Dungeons and Dragons

Dungeons and Dragons is a fun game and I think everyone should play it.

By Eric Porco

Staff Writer

(Image Credit: Wizards of the Coast)

As I write this I am listening to a Dungeons and Dragons livestream on the popular live-streaming platform Twitch.Tv. In this particular storyline or “Campaign” I have been watching, a group of five people from various backgrounds united to complete ancient Elven trials to inherit a giant magical city-state, only to through various mistakes and mischief the literal days following the beginning of their rule blow up half of it and accidentally transport themselves to a giant planet-like space whale drifting through the galaxy. 

In my own campaign that I run for my friends, my group has embarked on a journey across the hostile desert sands to assassinate an old sickly bishop of a large imperialist empire, by the request of his mysterious and exiled son. Already has my group closely crossed paths with death, and has only nearly evaded it. What I hope to communicate with this is that Dungeons and Dragons, or “D&D” for short, is really fun. 

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The Dangers of Voter Suppression Laws in America

By Marissa Yelenik

Online Editor

This past election was a tense one for both of America’s primary parties, resulting in many Republicans struggling to come to terms with the results. The now-former President Donald Trump lost to President Joe Biden, and while this was a relief to some, others found it to be not only an injustice, but a blatant attack on democracy, touting lines such as “Stop the Steal” to show their support for Trump and try to pressure Congress into reversing the results of the election. This resulted in extreme discourse, even causing the Capitol insurrection.

The 2020 loss for Trump came as a shock to many Republicans, with Arizona, Georgia, Pennsylvania, Michigan, and Wisconsin all flipping from their votes for Trump in 2016 to Biden in 2020. Some of these states were extremely close, such as Georgia, which was split 49.5% for Biden, 49.2% for Trump.

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The Capitol Insurrection

Just one example of widespread division in the United States.

By Kosta Magoulas

Editorials Editor

Liveblog: Trump Incites Violent Insurrection on Capitol Hill – Mother Jones
https://www.motherjones.com/politics/2021/01/congressional-offices-evacuated-as-furious-trump-supporters-storm-capitol-hill/

On January 6, 2021, the Capital of Washington D.C. was filled with rioters, many of them donning Make America Great Again (MAGA) merchandise and Trump flags. National Public Radio (NPR) reported that President Donald Trump was seen telling his supporters prior that  “this election was stolen from you, from me, from the country.” Pandemonium floods the streets soon after. People carrying weapons, planting pipe bombs, and people not wearing masks were just a few things that took place during the riots. Rioters were even able to storm into the capitol building, breaking through fencing and barricades from the police. Not only did it affect the work of everyone in the capitol, it ultimately endangered their lives as well. All of this was simply a mess.

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Outpour of Student and Community Support for HoCo SMOB Following Lawsuit

By Uma Ribeiro

Editor-in-Chief

Image Source: hcasc.hcpss.org

Take action to protect student voice by signing this petition

Two parents of Howard County Public School students, Traci Spiegel and Kimberly Ford, filed a lawsuit against the Howard County Student Member of the Board (SMOB) position on Wednesday, December 16th, following the Board of Education’s vote to keep students virtual. In the lawsuit, parents argue that since the Student Member is under eighteen years of age, whoever holds that position should not be allowed to exercise their vote. 

The current Student Member, Zach Koung, was not the only board member to vote against the motion for a hybrid learning model. The majority of the Board leaned the same way, with members Jen Mallo, Jolene Mosley, and Antonia Barkley Watts voting to keep students virtual for the time being rather than return to in-person learning before April.

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Kamala Harris: A Contradiction

By Kosta Magoulas

Editorials Editor

Promo image showing Kamala Harris

Image Source: bbc.com

Throughout Kamala Harris’s career in government, it has seemed like she has contradicted herself many times. Whether it be who she supported or what she supported, Harris did things that went against previous things she had advocated for. Now, Harris is going to be the Vice President Elect, so what beliefs she has now and what her beliefs were previously should be looked at in order to get a better understanding of how she may act when in office. 

Kamala Devi Harris was born October 20, 1964, in Oakland, California. Harris studied Political Science and economics in 1986 from Howard College, and in 1989, earned a law degree from Hastings College. In 1990 – 1998 in Oakland, she worked as a deputy district attorney. She then later became district attorney in 2004. In 2010 she earned the title of attorney general in the state of California. From these facts alone, it is evident that Harris has achieved some very great feats. 

There have been many things Harris has said that have contradicted previous beliefs. Firstly, the contradiction regarding the death penalty:

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Opinion: The fears some Americans have about Amy Coney Barrett and the future of human rights in the US

By Jaria Butler

Photography Editor

Image source: npr.org

On Monday, October 26th, the Senate voted to confirm Amy Coney Barrett’s nomination for the Supreme Court 52 to 48 as the replacement of Ruth Bader Ginsburg, who died on September 18, 2020. Ginsburg left a remarkable legacy shaping modern American life, being the second woman ever to be appointed onto the U.S. Supreme Court. 

Ginsburg fought against gender discrimination, co-founded the ACLU’s Women’s Rights Project, and passionately fought for the rights of the LGBTQ+ community, undocumented people and disabled people. She also fought to expand voting rights.

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Opinion: Why Donald Trump Is Dangerous To Democracy

With the recent reactions to the American presidential election, heads around the world have been turning.

By Eric Porco

Staff Writer

(Photo Credit: Mark Peterson / Redux)

On November 7th, 2020, it was announced that Joe Biden would be the next president of the United States of America. Donald Trump, the current president of the United States and Joe Biden’s competitor in the race, tweeted on the same day “I WON THIS ELECTION, BY A LOT!” shortly after major news sources started reporting the election results. Trump, despite sources overwhelmingly maintaining that Joe Biden won the election, has held his position that he won the election, tweeting later, on November 16th, “I won the Election!”

It is almost needless to say, Trump did not win the 2020 presidential election, and likely, he knows that too. Trump’s own “Voting Integrity Commission,” now disbanded, had claimed 8,400 instances of voter fraud across 20 states in the 2016 election, an incredibly small number that when spread out among the 20 states would not have been nearly enough to swing any elections. Voter fraud in the United States is not an issue. However, the claim that it is being propagated benefits Donald Trump, as it gives his voter base a perceived reason to claim his continued legitimacy as president. 

These actions are incredibly dangerous to Democracy, and the way that Trump has treated this election fans the flames of division in our country, which could have deadly ramifications if the worst comes to pass. Trump claims to have won the election despite official sources saying otherwise, his own Secretary of State claiming, “There will be a smooth transition to a second Trump administration.” 

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County Executive Calvin Ball Supports ICE, Ignores Urges From Residents

By Uma Ribeiro

Editor-in-chief

Pictured: protesters urge Ball to support CB 51 at a news conference

On Monday, October 5th, the Howard County Council voted on bill CB 51, with Council members Liz Walsh, Christiana Rigby, and Deb Jung voting in favor and Opel Jones and David Yungmann voting against. The bill, proposed by councilwoman Liz Walsh, would have ended Howard County’s longstanding contract with ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) detention. However, the bill was vetoed on October 7th only two days after it passed 3-2, by County Executive Calvin Ball. 

For months before the vote, immigrant justice organizations—including CASA, a group expanding opportunities for the Latino and immigrant communities, and the Howard County Coalition for Immigrant Justice as well as local youth activism organizations such as Hoco For Justice—urged for councilmembers to pass the bill. Residents advocated for Howard County to end its cooperation with ICE, an institution deeply rooted in racism and cruel and inhumane treatment of Black and Brown immigrants. 

Written and vocal testimonies in favor of the bill flooded in, from those affected firsthand to students advocating for the bill. Howard County residents urged Ball to listen to their advocacy, and for Howard County to join Montgomery, Anne Arundel, Prince George’s, and Prince William County, along with Baltimore City, in discontinuing their collaboration with ICE.

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